Our vet has recommended that all dogs under 6 months not to spay or neuter the pups because they are too young and their bodies are not fully developed.  Adoption donation includes transport and all vaccinations, except for the Lyme—therefore, the dogs will not need to get any vaccinations for the first


ADOPTED ON 03-02-21: Meet Kora, an absolutely beautiful 4 year old, 58 pound Rottweiler mix. Clearly the predominant breed is Rottweiler, with that luxurious shiny black coat and pretty brown markings. Kora was rescued just in time from a kill shelter in TX. It is unclear why she was left there, and sadly, this happens very frequently. Too often a dog is dropped at a shelter because owners “just don’t have time” or “she doesn’t behave”, or simply because a puppy is a novelty and when the dog grows up it becomes a nuisance. The casualty is a pup that is ripped from the only home he or she ever knew. Whatever the case may be, Kora was extremely lucky and is currently with a loving foster family while she awaits her forever home.

Kora Is A Bit Of A Lap Dog
And She Loves Butt Scratches

Kora’s foster family says she is super sweet but not needy. She loves her people, but is also perfectly happy laying in her bed chewing a bone. She is spayed, microchipped, heartworm negative, dewormed, flea/tick treated, and up to date on all her vaccines. Now all she needs is her own people to complete the package! Kora is very loyal, and would be a great family dog; likely with older children due to her size and breed. It is always recommended that young children are never left unsupervised with ANY dog. Children often love to be physical (ie: big bear hugs) with their new family members and rescue dogs can become nervous. We can never be very sure of what these pups have gone through. An adult-only home would be great for Kora as well. She is a true love bug with her humans and is very mellow, but likes to be “in charge” with other dogs, so being the only dog in the home would suit her well. Though “neediness” is a common trait in Rottweilers, Kora displays none of that so far. Kora seems to be fully house trained and her manners are very good. She will be very gentle with her fluffy bed in her kennel and is quite obliging when her humans dress her up. You can see by her pictures how patient (and pretty!) she looks!

Kora has many of the typical Rottweiler
characteristics and is protective of her family

Kora is calm natured and loves walks.  She walks great on the leash, and has shown no aggression at all towards other dogs from a distance while walking. While in her yard Kora only reacts to other dogs if they get too close to her fence. She absolutely LOVES car rides. Foster mom took her out for an afternoon and she jumped right in the car and laid down. She was great for the whole ride! The medical staff at the vet that cared for her said that she was a very easy and polite lady when they had to treat or examine her for anything. All the volunteers loved her!

When choosing a new family member it is important to research the different breeds of dogs available to you. Personality traits, size, and temperament should all be key factors when deciding what pup will fit well in your family. The Rottweiler is one of the most popular dogs in the USA, UK, and Canada. For good reason, too, as this breed is a wonderful blend of the loving house-dog and the steadfast protector that will guard your home and your children. Not only that, but they’re relatively easy to manage within the home, as they don’t require vigorous exercise, and their intelligence makes them one of the easier dog breeds to train. Rottweilers are also relatively docile, and are willing to learn at the hand of someone they love (although it takes a bit to build that trust for this breed).

The Rottweiler breed often gets a bad reputation. You’ve probably heard — in one way or another — that Rotties can be incredibly aggressive, downright mean, and off-putting to other people. While these traits can certainly be true, and are perhaps a bit worse when it comes with a dog powerful enough to do damage, these traits don’t apply to most Rottweilers.

The true personality of a Rottweiler, and what they were bred to be, is a mixture of the loyal, steadfast watchdog, and the incredibly loving homebody. Also, despite popular belief, the Rottweiler is actually one of the most intelligent dog breeds in existence. Their ability to learn, adapt to their environments, and their keen eye for their surroundings are nearly unparalleled. Not only that, but they’re also well-rounded within the home. They’re patient and gentle with children, and the more they grow to know them, the stronger their protective nature becomes.

Rottweilers are very cautious dogs, and people often see this as standoffishness or mean. This personality trait is rooted in their history. They’re extremely reserved when it comes to others infringing upon those they love, but that doesn’t mean they’re not friendly. They’re simply aware of the situation, and know how they must react if they’re called to action.

The personality of a Rottweiler can also sometimes be considered needy. They love to be loved, and love to love, and often create a sense of dependency with their owners. Meaning these are not the dogs to own if you don’t have the proper time to be at home with them (or train them, as Rottweilers come with serious responsibility). Rottweilers, while dignified, confident, and powerful, are also extremely sensitive.  All-in-all, these dogs are fantastic companions and will protect the household in earnest, will love abundantly, and are great additions to a home with youngsters. Another thing to note about their personality is that they’re fearless. If they’re called to action, or feel they need to protect those they love, they never hesitate.

Kora has many of the typical Rottweiler characteristics and is protective of her family and the people she loves. It is part of the breed. She will need someone that can help show her that she doesn’t have to worry about protecting them. She needs to know when she should alert and when not to alert to situations. A family that is very familiar with this breed, or a similar one, would be ideal for Kora. She is on the right path and, so far, has been a model citizen, but training will need to continue.  She is a delightful girl and will be a wonderful addition to the right family. Those who know Rotties will quickly realize Kora is a gem!


MASSACHUSETTS RESIDENTS 

This dog cannot be adopted to Massachusetts residents due to new laws regarding rescue dogs being prohibited from adoption. 

Please contact Patricia Cabral or Mike Cahill for questions regarding what dogs you are allowed to adopt 
Cahill, Mike                                              

Director, Animal Health
Michael.Cahill@mass.gov
617-626-1794

Cabral, Patricia                        

Shelter and Rescue Coordinator, Animal Health
Patricia.Cabral@mass.gov
617-626-1786

Here is a link to the list of approved rescues
https://www.mass.gov/service-details/approved-shelter-and-rescue-organizations

We go the extra mile for every dog and do whatever it takes to make sure that that dog finds happiness, we give 100% and more. It is what we enjoy doing and helps us wake up in the morning; we know that the dog is thankful we rescued them and thankful for their life. Finally, they will be forever remembered by our families that adopted them because they really rescued them.

See more “About the Breed” At End of The Bio Below


This dog cannot be adopted to Massachusetts residents due to new laws regarding rescue dogs being prohibited from adoption. Please contact Patricia Cabral at: 617-626-1786 or Mike Cahill at: 617-626-1794 for questions regarding what dogs you are allowed to adopt 

ALL interested adopters MUST complete an application; agree to a vet reference check, phone interview and home visit. ALL family members MUST be in attendance for home visits – no exceptions. This helps us get to know everyone in the family so that we can help find the right dog for you 

Disclaimer: Please note that the breeds posted on our dogs’ biographies are our best guess based on years of working with rescue dogs. Adopters who need to know the exact breed or mix of breeds of a particular dog must have the dog’s DNA tested at their own expense.


 

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